1. #1

    I may be mistaken....

    ....but I don't think the NCAA gets a dime from college football or any bowl games or the upcoming college football playoff. I think all of that goes to conferences/teams.

    I think something like 95% of the NCAA's revenue comes from the NCAA Basketball Tournament and the rest from other, small, ancilliary things.

    So if that's the case, whether the NCAA decided to punish Penn State or not should have no bearing on their bottom line or have any other financial repercusions for them as they don't have any financial affiliation with college football.

    Do I have this wrong?

  2. #2

    Re: I may be mistaken....

    Quote Originally Posted by SpiderRico View Post
    ....but I don't think the NCAA gets a dime from college football or any bowl games or the upcoming college football playoff. I think all of that goes to conferences/teams.

    I think something like 95% of the NCAA's revenue comes from the NCAA Basketball Tournament and the rest from other, small, ancilliary things.

    So if that's the case, whether the NCAA decided to punish Penn State or not should have no bearing on their bottom line or have any other financial repercusions for them as they don't have any financial affiliation with college football.

    Do I have this wrong?
    You are correct.

    Most of the football revenue is distributed by the BCS, which is a separate organization, or by the conferences which make their own TV deals with the networks. The NCAA governs the sport of football, but I you are correct in that the NCAA itself does not see most football revenues.

    Most of the NCAA revenues however are distributed back to member institutions though. It's profits are distributed back to the schools, so its motivation isn't going to be tied to keeping money for itself.

    Most of the football revenue is generated by selling TV broadcast rights, ticket sales, and to a lesser degree any advertising in or around the stadium. Each school gets to keep the revenue generated by home ticket sales and stadium advertising, unless their conference has some rules that redistributes some of that revenue, like the Big Ten does.

    The TV contracts are signed with the BCS, the bowl games, and the individual conferences. The BCS and conferences then distribute the money to the member schools.

    The NCAA's primary source of revenue is from the TV rights for the Mens' Basketball Tournament.
    Last edited by BillikenHawkeye; 07-17-2012 at 04:01 PM.

  3. #3

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    Re: I may be mistaken....

    I think the CFA also. It's really an interesting relationship the NCAA has with college football.

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